How To Share Documents on LinkedIn

By LinkedIn Ninja | Latest Articles

May 09

Update to this article 4/2016

Many people find this article via search and the method to share documents described in the original article is no longer valid on LinkedIn.  LinkedIn has since made it much easier to share documents.

Share Document via Status Update:Share a Photo or Document

LinkedIn recently had a paperclip that made it clear that you could share a document – such as a pdf, Word document, etc. – in a status update by directly uploading it. They have since removed that paperclip icon and only have the upload a photo icon. You CAN upload documents with the Upload a Photo function – you are not limited to only image files. Feel free to use that function for flyers and documents that are not stand alone photos.

Sharing Documents on the Profile:

LinkedIn has now embedded the ability to display work samples, marketing collateral and other documents, images, audio and video files directly in your LinkedIn profile. Add Media Icon This type of content can be added at the bottom of your Summary, below each Experience entry and each Education entry. Simply look for this icon when you are editing your profile.

 

Videos and audio/podcast files cannot be directly uploaded to LinkedIn, but you can share the link to the video or audio hosted somewhere else – such as YouTube, Vimeo, Broadcast News, iTunes, etc. Add Media - Get YouTube URL You need to use the actual link to the video – not the link to the web page is it embedded in. Look for the share icon in the media and get the shareable url. That is what you will need to paste into LinkedIn to embed the content in your profile.

Leveraging SlideShare for Sharing Content in Status Updates and on your Profile:

LinkedIn now owns SlideShare. Utilizing SlideShare to insert content into your profile or share in a status update is the method that will give you the biggest bang for your buck – though it takes a few more steps. SlideShare is a separate social network that was originally built for sharing PowerPoint Presentations. People search it for educational and informational content. It currently supports PowerPoints, Word Docs, Open Office Docs and Presentations, and pdfs. You can embed a YouTube video into a PowerPoint, but you cannot upload video directly. When you upload a file to SlideShare, it provides a simple interface to add to your LinkedIn profile. Each upload also has a unique url to share via status update.

The biggest benefit of SlideShare is that it provides analytics. If you want to know how many people are looking at your stuff, this is the only way to do it. LinkedIn provides NO analytics for content directly uploaded to the profile. A secondary benefit is that people may find you and your content directly in SlideShare and a tertiary benefit is that you can share the uploads on any social network and even embed them directly into websites and blogs.

SlideShare is free and your account can be built directly from your LinkedIn account. They also have a premium lead generation service to insert forms into your content to gather requests for more information from those who read them.

 

****The feature described below is no longer available on a LinkedIn Profile. Use the Updated Instructions Instead****

One thing that many people struggle with on LinkedIn is how to share content that doesn’t live on the web. By content, I mean documents, flyers, non-hosted audio files and the like. Much of small business still lives in the world of creating marketing collateral that results in a printed piece or a pdf file. Ideally, you would want to convert it to an html file and put it on your website which would give you a link that you could easily share on LinkedIn and with other social media. That can get a little tricky.

So, what do you do if you have a pdf flyer or newsletter that you want to share on  LinkedIn? You can’t attach documents to status updates. Heck! You can’t even attach documents to LinkedIn messages sent directly to your connections. So, does that mean that it’s just not possible to share documents and files? No! That’s where the partnership between  LinkedIn and Box comes in.

As long as you don’t mind who sees the document, you can share it on LinkedIn if you use the Box application on your LinkedIn profile.

To add the Box application to your profile, go to the More menu and scroll to the bottom and select Get More Applications. Find the application called Box and click on it. Click the Add Application button after making certain that the box next to “Display on my profile” is checked. You will have to set up a free account on Box before going any further. Once set up, you will be able to access your Box application from the More menu to add and remove files. You’ll see an Upload button that will walk you through uploading the document or file you want to share.

Once your file is uploaded, got to Edit Profile.  Scroll down to the Box application (if you haven’t used any applications on your profile yet, then it should be at the very bottom).  You’ll see the file that you uploaded and want to share.  If you see a big logo and a small file name, click on the Menu button in the upper right hand corner and select “List View” which will be the first item in the list. Your view will change to what you see in the image below.

If you hover your cursor over the file name, you will see a blue arrow appear at the end of the row.  Click on that arrow and you’ll get a drop down menu. Select “Get Web Link” and you’ll get a pop up with a web link that you can copy.

You can now use this link to share your document in social media status updates and via LinkedIn‘s messaging system. As you will see in the final image, when you use the “Attach a Link” feature, it treats your document just like any article. However, the description is the description of the Box application. To change that simply click on the blue Edit link at the end of the description and you can add your own description of what the document is that you’re sharing.

By the way, want to know the best part? Whenever anyone clicks on that link and downloads the document, Box will sent you an email notification. It can’t tell you who looked at it, but you’ll be able to track how many people do look at it.

A best practice is to always use a document format – like pdf or mp3- that is easily shared and used by all. If you leave your document in Word or other raw format, only those people who have that software will be able to open the document. Also, you would be giving a document that can be easily changed and manipulated allowing others to possibly steal your work.

Is this the first time you’ve ever heard this  LinkedIn tip? If so, please let me know in the comments.

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About the Author

Crystal Thies has been known as the LinkedIn Ninja since founding her company, Crystal Clear Buzz, in 2009. Although well versed and experienced in all social media, Crystal specializes in the utilization of LinkedIn for sales and business development. As a past financial planner, Crystal is one of the few social media strategists with expertise to work with those regulated by FINRA, the SEC, and IIROC. She is the co-author of “The Social Media Handbook for Financial Advisors” published by Bloomberg Press.

Leave a Comment:

(15) comments

chris d November 7, 2017

any word documents I load to LinkedIn gets butchered by their formatting, MY lines and paragraphs/ formatting etc all seemingly reordered at random, any help ?

Reply
    LinkedIn Ninja November 7, 2017

    Chris,

    I recommend against using Word documents as there is no way to preserve the formatting and not everyone uses Word and their Word version may be old. If you’re using a new version of Word, you can Export the document as a pdf. Upload the pdf. That way you know that your formatting will stay the same and everyone can read it.

    Reply
conroy Jones June 2, 2017

I’ve tried to upload a PDF to my Linked in article. When I go to check the PDF poster it’s been replaced by a picture of a newspaper ! What’s happening?

Reply
Andrew Kinney April 12, 2017

I’m trying to post a MS Word Doc as a post and I get an error when trying to upload the doc.
Please advise the fix for this.

Thanks

Reply
Hawkins February 28, 2017

this was bang on. LI for some bizarre reason removed the paper clip and put a camera icon in its place, and that leaves the user in the dark. This link put me straight in seconds. It is strong where LI isn’t.

Reply
Deborah Gosser November 21, 2016

I was able to attach a word document in Linkdin but then is was not readable – is there a fix for this? It was blurry when I pulled it up on my iphone to read it.

Reply
John Williamson November 20, 2016

When I use the “View profile as” feature to view what it looks like to the Public, my uploaded files are not visible, so I don’t think uploaded files are able to be seen by non-connections.

Reply
Mary Ann Ernette October 19, 2016

Thank you. It worked.

Reply
NOrm July 29, 2016

Trying to send my resume. I can attach it to the message, but I see know way to send it. can you help?

Reply
NYCRecruiter May 17, 2012

Do visitors who try to access your documents from BOX need to sign up for an account, or are they able to open the file directly from your LinkedIn page?

Reply
    Crystal Thies May 17, 2012

    Documents in your LinkedIn profile folder are publicly visible to anyone and everyone. You do not need a Box account to view them. If you don’t have a Box account and want to try it out, feel free to visit my profile and click on any of the documents in my Box app.

    Reply
    NYCRecruiter May 17, 2012

    Hmm. The issue I am running into, in fact, is that those without box accounts are not able to open or download the documents I’ve posted to my profile via my box account. 

    Reply
    Crystal Thies May 24, 2012

    I’ve actually never run into that issue. Do you know if those people are trying to access it from their corporate office? I have seen corporate computer security systems that block or limit access to the applications in LinkedIn. It’s really strange. I remember being in one of my Wells Fargo client’s offices and looking at my own profile wondering where in the heck my applications went, when I realized it was a security system blocking them from loading. I have heard of other levels of such security to prevent the downloading of files in case they have some sort of virus or malware because the systems often can’t scan it first.

    I love testing some of this stuff out, so if you have a specific situation that we can try and duplicate to figure out the problem, then I’m game. Just let me know.

    Reply
    jerry white October 14, 2014

    Ok, I am looking for the more menu and can’t find it anywhere on LinkedIn. Can you help??

    Reply
    Crystal Thies October 14, 2014

    Jerry,

    This function is no longer available on LinkedIn. Look for the paper clip in the status update box and you can upload the document directly into LinkedIn. You can also upload it as a pdf into SlideShare and share that link in the status update. Since LinkedIn owns SlideShare, it now favors it over Box.

    Reply
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